by: Editorial team Gaming in Holland, Joost van Kleef & Martin van Geest

CANALIZATION, NOT CANNIBALIZATION

The first of a series of Gaming in Holland Round Tables was held December 12th 2013. The goal of these get-togethers is to inform professionals in the Dutch gaming sector about the latest developments, to exchange knowledge and to facilitate a positive and constructive dialogue. The first Round Table took place in the conference center of the Mövenpick Hotel in Amsterdam. No less than 74 professionals from all subsectors in the Dutch gaming industry were present.

The subject of this round table was the current state of European and Dutch legislation concerning online gaming. Maarten Haijer, secretary general of the European Gaming & Betting Association (EGBA) in Brussels, delivered an informative and engaging presentation. His three main points:

  1. The Dutch government strives to canalize 75 percent of Dutch online gaming revenue to regulated and licensed operators (data by H2 Gambling). This is not an ambitious target, to say the least.
  2. The EU has not developed a definitive, harmonized European legal framework concerning online gaming yet. However, this does not mean that the Netherlands is totally free to develop its own legislation and gaming policy. The Dutch government is bound to take into account existing European rules.
  3. The Dutch charity lotteries and Dutch charitable organizations stand to profit from online gaming regulation:
    • Contributions to charities and sports organizations will not diminish, but significantly increase.
    • Revenue of the existing charity lotteries will grow, partly thanks to new online opportunities.

In short: regulation of online gaming in Dutch gaming law will have a positive effect on contributions to charities and sports organizations.

Maarten Haijer’s presentation was followed by an animated discussion, moderated by lottery and sports betting expert Frank Bijman. Two issues were thoroughly discussed.

First, the Dutch charity lotteries are not convinced that regulation of online gaming will not result in their revenues declining (cannibalization).

Second, many operators are worried about future tax rates, be they set by the Dutch government or Brussels. Online gaming companies such as Unibet (represented by chief legal officer Ewout Keuleers) think that Dutch tax rates should be in line with tax rates for online operators in other European member states. Land-based gaming operators, including Holland Casino (represented by spokesman Mark Woldberg), would rather see equal taxation for offline and online gaming operators.

The Round Table was concluded with an informal round of drinks. Many participants took this opportunity to exchange opinions about current issues and to network with fellow gaming professionals. Jan Braaksma, journalist for Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf, mingled around the room – notepad in hand – to see if he could get a scoop. Willem van Oort, initiator of Gaming in Holland, was the last one to leave.

Joost van Kleef and Martin van Geest are former business journalists, who previously worked for Het Financieele Dagblad, Nieuwe Revu, Quote and The International Correspondent, to name a few. They have been reporting on the gaming industry for years. Currently, van Kleef and van Geest are advisors to the gaming industry on pr and media relations.by: Editorial team Gaming in Holland, Joost van Kleef & Martin van Geest

CANALIZATION, NOT CANNIBALIZATION

The first of a series of Gaming in Holland Round Tables was held December 12th 2013. The goal of these get-togethers is to inform professionals in the Dutch gaming sector about the latest developments, to exchange knowledge and to facilitate a positive and constructive dialogue. The first Round Table took place in the conference center of the Mövenpick Hotel in Amsterdam. No less than 74 professionals from all subsectors in the Dutch gaming industry were present.

egba2

The subject of this round table was the current state of European and Dutch legislation concerning online gaming. Maarten Haijer, secretary general of the European Gaming & Betting Association (EGBA) in Brussels, delivered an informative and engaging presentation. His three main points:

  1. The Dutch government strives to canalize 75 percent of Dutch online gaming revenue to regulated and licensed operators (data by H2 Gambling). This is not an ambitious target, to say the least.
  2. The EU has not developed a definitive, harmonized European legal framework concerning online gaming yet. However, this does not mean that the Netherlands is totally free to develop its own legislation and gaming policy. The Dutch government is bound to take into account existing European rules.
  3. The Dutch charity lotteries and Dutch charitable organizations stand to profit from online gaming regulation:
    • Contributions to charities and sports organizations will not diminish, but significantly increase.
    • Revenue of the existing charity lotteries will grow, partly thanks to new online opportunities.

In short: regulation of online gaming in Dutch gaming law will have a positive effect on contributions to charities and sports organizations.

Maarten Haijer’s presentation was followed by an animated discussion, moderated by lottery and sports betting expert Frank Bijman. Two issues were thoroughly discussed.

First, the Dutch charity lotteries are not convinced that regulation of online gaming will not result in their revenues declining (cannibalization).

Second, many operators are worried about future tax rates, be they set by the Dutch government or Brussels. Online gaming companies such as Unibet (represented by chief legal officer Ewout Keuleers) think that Dutch tax rates should be in line with tax rates for online operators in other European member states. Land-based gaming operators, including Holland Casino (represented by spokesman Mark Woldberg), would rather see equal taxation for offline and online gaming operators.

The Round Table was concluded with an informal round of drinks. Many participants took this opportunity to exchange opinions about current issues and to network with fellow gaming professionals. Jan Braaksma, journalist for Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf, mingled around the room – notepad in hand – to see if he could get a scoop. Willem van Oort, initiator of Gaming in Holland, was the last one to leave.

Joost van Kleef and Martin van Geest are former business journalists, who previously worked for Het Financieele Dagblad, Nieuwe Revu, Quote and The International Correspondent, to name a few. They have been reporting on the gaming industry for years. Currently, van Kleef and van Geest are advisors to the gaming industry on pr and media relations.by: Editorial team Gaming in Holland, Joost van Kleef & Martin van Geest

CANALIZATION, NOT CANNIBALIZATION

The first of a series of Gaming in Holland Round Tables was held December 12th 2013. The goal of these get-togethers is to inform professionals in the Dutch gaming sector about the latest developments, to exchange knowledge and to facilitate a positive and constructive dialogue. The first Round Table took place in the conference center of the Mövenpick Hotel in Amsterdam. No less than 74 professionals from all subsectors in the Dutch gaming industry were present.

egba2

The subject of this round table was the current state of European and Dutch legislation concerning online gaming. Maarten Haijer, secretary general of the European Gaming & Betting Association (EGBA) in Brussels, delivered an informative and engaging presentation. His three main points:

  1. The Dutch government strives to canalize 75 percent of Dutch online gaming revenue to regulated and licensed operators (data by H2 Gambling). This is not an ambitious target, to say the least.
  2. The EU has not developed a definitive, harmonized European legal framework concerning online gaming yet. However, this does not mean that the Netherlands is totally free to develop its own legislation and gaming policy. The Dutch government is bound to take into account existing European rules.
  3. The Dutch charity lotteries and Dutch charitable organizations stand to profit from online gaming regulation:
    • Contributions to charities and sports organizations will not diminish, but significantly increase.
    • Revenue of the existing charity lotteries will grow, partly thanks to new online opportunities.

In short: regulation of online gaming in Dutch gaming law will have a positive effect on contributions to charities and sports organizations.

Maarten Haijer’s presentation was followed by an animated discussion, moderated by lottery and sports betting expert Frank Bijman. Two issues were thoroughly discussed.

First, the Dutch charity lotteries are not convinced that regulation of online gaming will not result in their revenues declining (cannibalization).

Second, many operators are worried about future tax rates, be they set by the Dutch government or Brussels. Online gaming companies such as Unibet (represented by chief legal officer Ewout Keuleers) think that Dutch tax rates should be in line with tax rates for online operators in other European member states. Land-based gaming operators, including Holland Casino (represented by spokesman Mark Woldberg), would rather see equal taxation for offline and online gaming operators.

The Round Table was concluded with an informal round of drinks. Many participants took this opportunity to exchange opinions about current issues and to network with fellow gaming professionals. Jan Braaksma, journalist for Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf, mingled around the room – notepad in hand – to see if he could get a scoop. Willem van Oort, initiator of Gaming in Holland, was the last one to leave.

Joost van Kleef and Martin van Geest are former business journalists, who previously worked for Het Financieele Dagblad, Nieuwe Revu, Quote and The International Correspondent, to name a few. They have been reporting on the gaming industry for years. Currently, van Kleef and van Geest are advisors to the gaming industry on pr and media relations.

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